Blog

Knowledge Management’s Place in the Legal Department

Matthew Martin
Marketing Manager
ThinkstockPhotos-164208044

Zach Warren from LegalTech News wrote a great article today on how far the role of knowledge management has come in the past decade, and where it’s headed in the future.

In the article, he cites the fact that in a survey of 88 firms, 28 percent had a “director of knowledge management” or a similar title leading knowledge management (KM) operations, while an additional 14 percent featured a “chief knowledge officer” or a similar title.

Interestingly, the same ILTA survey revealed that 28 percent of firms expected to increase the number of full-time employees working on KM within the next 12 months, while just 2.2 percent expected to decrease that number.

The only issue that remains is, how exactly does KM fit into the modern law firm? Read an excerpt from the article below:

The Evolution of KM

Many legal innovations these days have their home in the U.S., but the knowledge management revolution is not one of them. Gary Sokulski, chief operating officer of Reed Smith, told Legaltech News that he first encountered KM after merging with a British firm, Warner Cranston, in 2001.

“We always thought the British firms had a more advanced view embracing knowledge, management knowledge and the like,” Sokulski says. “You always learn from your environment, I thought we learned a great deal from our British colleagues about the importance of technology and knowledge and information sharing.”

Ford joined Baker & McKenzie in June, but previously, he was at the forefront of the KM revolution as the leader of the global knowledge management team at U.K.-based Clifford Chance. He says that in his experience, the CKO should focus on three main areas: the content and technology itself, the systems that implement the technology (“Great content is no good unless people have access to it”), and the legal culture, both within KM community and with lawyers within the firm.

The last key, he notes, is often one that is forgotten. “Ultimately, that’s what I see the value of KM is about: Enabling all of our lawyers to deliver the whole firm,” Ford says. “The client is not just benefiting from the expertise and experience of the individual lawyer or even the team they’re interfacing with directly. They’re actually drawing on the experience and collective wisdom of the whole firm.”

Culture is particularly important, Ford says…

Key Features

Ikaun was built to help organizations easily create, discover, and use knowledge to enhance employee productivity and increase business outcomes.

Experience Finder

Experience Finder

Leverage your organization's collective experience for better decision making; easily search for internal experts by skill sets, industry expertise, and more.

AI-Enhanced Search

AI-Enhanced Search

Ikaun’s Intelligent-Knowledge-Assistant searches through your ikaun environment and other connected systems to help answer FAQs, find people, find assets, or support complex research scenarios.

Profiles

Profiles

Create easy-to-read profiles that include biography, skills / expertise, employment history, certifications, affiliations and other key information about your employees.

Stacks

Stacks

Organize and populate knowledge into a consolidated page that can be shared internally or externally with clients.

Knowledge Campaigns

Knowledge Campaigns

Deploy knowledge campaigns to inform employees about active pursuits, new clients, or firm news.

Integrations

Integrations

Connect your document management systems, CRM, and other popular applications with ease and confidence.